Category Archives: #geoblog

Geo-pic of the week: Ozark Plateaus

Ozark Plateau

If you live in Arkansas, chances are you’ve heard of the Ozark Mountains.  Actually, the correct geologic term is Ozark Plateaus.  Unlike typical mountains in which the bedrock has been squashed and folded, the Ozarks are one broad dome-like structure made up of flat-lying sedimentary bedrock.  The hills and valleys of the Ozark topography are the result of rivers carving into this dome, rather than compression or deformation.  

The picture above was taken overlooking the Buffalo River.  The various hills, from the foreground to the distance, are roughly the same height.  Of course they are!  If not for this and other rivers, the landscape pictured here would be one solid flat surface, as tall as the highest peaks in the picture, stretching to the horizon.  


Early map of Bathhouse Row, Hot Springs, Arkansas


(Click map to see large high-resolution version)


(Click picture to see large high-resolution version)


At top is a scan of a hand-drawn map of downtown Hot Springs Arkansas ca. 1859.  It was drawn By Dr. David Dale Owen, the first State Geologist of Arkansas.   It shows Bathhouse Row, the area renowned for its hot mineral-water springs (a photo of the area depicted on the left side of the map is included for comparison).  Bathhouse Row remains a popular attraction today, though a lot has changed since 1859. 

Hot Spring Creek, which displays across the bottom of the map north to south (note that north is to the left here), now flows underneath Central Avenue in downtown Hot Springs.  Central Avenue is the street at the bottom of the photograph (see photo).  In 1860, there was no Central Avenue and people crossed Hot Spring Creek on wooden bridges (see map).  The bluff east of the creek from which the hot springs flow is now Hot Springs National Park.

This map was included in the second of two geological reconnaissance reports published by Dr. David Dale Owen concerning Arkansas geology.  During the field work for that publication in 1859, Dr. Owen, only fifty three years old, contracted malaria.  He died a short time later.  In the introduction to the final volume of that publication, Dr. Owen’s brother writes that David was dictating the report, from bed, until 3 days before his death. 


David Dale Owen portrait

Geopic of the week: Skolithos


st. pete skolithos

Skolithos is a common type of trace fossil that has been found in rocks as old as 541 million years.  Trace fossils are not the fossilized remains of organisms but rather the burrows, footprints, and other structures that resulted from the animal’s activities.

In the case of skolithos, it’s widely believed that a vermiform (resembling a worm) animal created the straight, vertical, tube structures.  These worm-like critters probably lived by filtering plankton from the turbulent water of a shallow marine environment.  The vertical tubes may have been a dwelling place to retreat to, though their specific purpose is not known.

In the above picture, captured in north central Arkansas, a sandstone has weathered to reveal skolithos traces permeating the approximately 460 million year old rock.  This example is from an exposure of the St. Peter Formation, Buffalo National River Park, Marion County, Arkansas.

To see more views of skolithos traces from Arkansas click here

Geo-pic of the week: Veins

Ron Colemans Quartz Mine, quartz veins, truck, CStone, 18 Jun 02

Any rockhound worth their salt knows that the best place to hunt for interesting minerals is in the void spaces in rock.  Void spaces come in two types; vugs and veins.  Vugs are usually found in igneous rock and result from trapped gas bubbles.  Veins, on the other hand, can be found in any type of bedrock. 

Veins are fractures, that have been plugged with minerals, typically by precipitation from circulating water.  The above picture was taken in the Ron Coleman quartz mine, near Hot Springs, Arkansas.   The near-parallel white streaks that riddle the sandstone are quartz-filled veins.  The fractures resulted from the intense deformation of the Ouachita Mountains, by plate tectonic forces, around 300 million years ago.  That deformation opened up space for quartz to grow in, and the tremendous heat and pressure from the mountain-building generated the mineral-rich fluid that deposited the crystals.      

Geo-pic of the week: Herringbone Cross-Bedding



Pictured above is sandstone displaying classic herringbone cross-beds.  Cross-bedding results from either sediment transport by flowing water, such as in this example, or by wind flow, as in the case of dunes.

Cross-beds form by the migration of sediment, and tilt in the direction of flow.  As sediment grains are carried by the current, they migrate up the gentle ramp of previously deposited cross-beds.  When they reach the end, they tumble down the steeper face there and are deposited to become part of the next cross-bed.  In this way the sediment migrates in the downstream direction.

Each group of similarly tilted cross-beds is known as a set.  In herringbone cross-bedding, the sets are oriented contrarily, which gives the outcrop a fishbone appearance.  These differently oriented cross-bed sets indicate changing flow directions.    

Geo-pic of the week: Tempestite


A tempestite, like the one pictured, is a rock composed of debris deposited by a storm.  It’s mostly a sandstone but also contains various fossils, pebbles, and other clasts that were picked up and tossed about by the waves.

Waves are generated as wind energy is transferred to water.  Naturally, during a storm, waves are bigger and more energetic.  This increased energy allows the waves to pick up, and in some cases rip up, various relatively large clasts and fossils and transport them.  The large elongate fossil above is an extinct squid-like creature known as a conical nautiloid.  Other marine fossils in this sample include gastropods, and crinoids.  It also contains plant material.

The presence of tempestites in a rock outcrop indicate the area was a shallow marine environment when those rocks were being deposited.  This sample was collected in Northwest Arkansas from the Pennsylvanian Prairie Grove Member of the Hale Formation.