Tag Archives: Geology

Geo-pic of the week: Fluvial Erosion

Buffalo River Valley

Recently, we posted a blog explaining that the Ozark Mountains are actually incised plateaus and that the hills are remnants standing between the incised river valleys. If you missed that one you can see it here.  Now, we will talk about how a river is able to erode solid rock.

The picture above is of the Buffalo National River in its valley. As you can see, an impressive volume of rock has been excavated by this little river. A common misconception is that the water is carving the rock. Water is soft and softer things generally do not abrade harder things. Slightly acidic water can dissolve rock very slowly, particularly carbonate rock like limestone, However, the majority of the erosion in a river is due to the sediment suspended in the flowing water. As the sediment – which can range from tiny grains of silt to boulders– is carried downstream by the current, it skips along the channel, colliding with the bedrock. The repeated collisions break down the sediment, chipping off edges and rounding it. By the same process, new sediment is ground away from the bedrock and the valley is slowly enlarged.

The same thing is true of wind erosion such as in a desert setting.  The wind itself really can’t erode the rock.   The erosion is due to strong winds lifting loose sand and blasting it against the solid rock, slowly wearing it away.

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Geo-pic of the week: Ozark Plateaus

Ozark Plateau

If you live in Arkansas, chances are you’ve heard of the Ozark Mountains.  Actually, the correct geologic term is Ozark Plateaus.  Unlike typical mountains in which the bedrock has been squashed and folded, the Ozarks are one broad dome-like structure made up of flat-lying sedimentary bedrock.  The hills and valleys of the Ozark topography are the result of rivers carving into this dome, rather than compression or deformation.  

The picture above was taken overlooking the Buffalo River.  The various hills, from the foreground to the distance, are roughly the same height.  Of course they are!  If not for this and other rivers, the landscape pictured here would be one solid flat surface, as tall as the highest peaks in the picture, stretching to the horizon.  

Geo-pic of the week: Herringbone Cross-Bedding

 

Crossbedding

Pictured above is sandstone displaying classic herringbone cross-beds.  Cross-bedding results from either sediment transport by flowing water, such as in this example, or by wind flow, as in the case of dunes.

Cross-beds form by the migration of sediment, and tilt in the direction of flow.  As sediment grains are carried by the current, they migrate up the gentle ramp of previously deposited cross-beds.  When they reach the end, they tumble down the steeper face there and are deposited to become part of the next cross-bed.  In this way the sediment migrates in the downstream direction.

Each group of similarly tilted cross-beds is known as a set.  In herringbone cross-bedding, the sets are oriented contrarily, which gives the outcrop a fishbone appearance.  These differently oriented cross-bed sets indicate changing flow directions.    

Geo-pic of the week: Tempestite

tempestite

A tempestite, like the one pictured, is a rock composed of debris deposited by a storm.  It’s mostly a sandstone but also contains various fossils, pebbles, and other clasts that were picked up and tossed about by the waves.

Waves are generated as wind energy is transferred to water.  Naturally, during a storm, waves are bigger and more energetic.  This increased energy allows the waves to pick up, and in some cases rip up, various relatively large clasts and fossils and transport them.  The large elongate fossil above is an extinct squid-like creature known as a conical nautiloid.  Other marine fossils in this sample include gastropods, and crinoids.  It also contains plant material.

The presence of tempestites in a rock outcrop indicate the area was a shallow marine environment when those rocks were being deposited.  This sample was collected in Northwest Arkansas from the Pennsylvanian Prairie Grove Member of the Hale Formation.

Geo-pic of the week: Oncolite

DSCN2293

Oncolite is a limestone made of oncoids, the roundish, tan things in the picture (average size less than an inch).  Oncoids are made by microbes called cyanobacteria.  Cyanobacteria, which also form larger mounds called stromatolites, are thought by many scientists to be one of the earliest forms of life to evolve on Earth.

The microbes attach to a nucleus – in this case fossil fragments – and encrust it in layers of calcium carbonate.  The bacteria gather energy by photosynthesis and, thus, require access to the sun.  Because they are easy to recognize and mostly limited to shallow marine environments, oncolites are useful to geologists, both as a stratigraphic marker and as an indicator of the depositional environment of the rock they are preserved in.    

These were photographed in the Kessler Limestone Member of the Bloyd Formation, northwest Arkansas.

Geo-pic of the week: Dogtooth Calcite

dogtooth2E

(FOV approx. 10 cm, photo by Corbin Cannon)

Even though they might look like it, those crystals in the picture above didn’t come out of a dog’s mouth. They are crystals of dogtooth calcite. Calcite (CaCO3) is the primary mineral that makes up limestone. It occurs in several crystal shapes. The two most commonly found in Arkansas are 6 sided rhombohedrons and the scalenohedral shape you see above. When it forms in this scalenohedral crystal structure it is called “dogtooth spar”.

Calcite is a very common mineral, but this particular crystal form of the mineral is typically only found in Arkansas in conjunction with the minerals sphalerite (zinc ore) and galena (lead ore) in the lead and zinc districts. Calcite is also a polymorph, like the mineral brookite from a previous geo-pic. This means calcite has “sister” minerals with the same chemical composition, but differing crystal structures. The three polymorphs of CaCO3 are: calcite, aragonite, and vaterite.