Tag Archives: Fairfield Bay

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Hello all! Sorry I haven’t blogged in awhile. I’ve been so busy trying to complete the maps for this year by the June 30th deadline.  But, I am proud to announce that the Geologic Maps for Shirley and Fairfield Bay are now published and available on our website!  Click below to view and download the maps.

http://www.geology.ar.gov/maps_pdf/geologic/24k_maps/Shirley.pdf http://www.geology.ar.gov/maps_pdf/geologic/24k_maps/Fairfield%20Bay.pdf

The process to create these maps takes an entire year. I kept you updated each field week from July to April last year, so I thought you might be interested to know how we take the raw data we collected in the field and use it to make a map. First of all, it’s a collaborative effort.  It takes a lot of people who specialize in various disciplines working together to make this product.  Basically, drawing the map starts with the notes we took in the field.  At each point, we tried to identify the rock formation exposed there.  Sometimes this was difficult, especially in the southern portion of the Boston Mountains Plateau where we worked this year. These rocks are all so similar–mostly sandstone and shale.  Nevertheless, if you cover as much ground as we did, you begin to discern similarities in the rock types and bedding structures, and can make formation calls based on those similarities.  Many of the points are taken on what we considered to be contacts between different formations.  These points are used to hand draw contact lines on a blank topographic base map. 2014-07-11 0032014-07-11 007 These lines are continued into areas where the contacts may not be exposed, because we assume lateral continuity of these units.  Many times there are topographic breaks along these contacts which can help us draw the lines in areas of poor exposure or in areas we just didn’t get to.  Structural lines are drawn along the trace of faults or other structures at the surface in areas where we saw the hallmarks of faulting such as deformation bands and non-vertical joints.  Also, the many strike and dip measurements we took were plotted on the map and helped determine orientation of faults and other structures, such as the axis of a monocline.  Once all the lines were neatly drawn on the topo, it was scanned into the computer and georeferenced to the grid of all quads in the state.  Next, each line was painstakingly digitized in ArcView by one of our cartographers, in this case Brian Kehner.  The digitized map was then added to a layout that Danny created in Adobe Illustrator. 2014-07-11 008

The layout includes descriptions of each formation developed from our field notes and are specific to each quad.  A correlation of map units, a generalized stratigraphic column, an inset map of the locations of the field points, a symbol chart, and a rose diagram of the frequency of each joint direction are also added to the layout.  A cross-section based on formation thickness is hand drawn, digitized, and placed along the bottom of the layout. Formations are symbolized by color and an abbreviation.  Sometimes photos are added to balance the layout.  Also plotted are any quarries or pits we found or were in the economic commodities database we keep at the Survey.

2014-07-11 012 After we have a reasonably good map, it’s printed and set out for staff review.  They really let us have it, but this editing process always greatly improves the maps.  After two or three revisions, we finalize it and send it to the USGS by June 30 to fulfill the requirements of the STATEMAP grant.  Whew!  What a relief!Geologic Map of Shirley red1 Geologic Map of Fairfield Bay red This year, as in years past, I have designed a commemorative STATEMAP t-shirt.  I’m taking orders until July 25th if anyone is interested.  They are available for the cost of the shirt you choose plus the printing.  Please email me at richard.hutto@arkansas.gov for details. AGS14_shirt_front (1)AGS14_shirt_back (1) Now we get ready to head back out again to our new field area.  This year we’ll be mapping the Parma, Prim, and Greers Ferry quads.  I’m breaking in a new field partner this time out.  Andrew Haner says he’s looking forward to seeing some of the Arkansas wilderness.   I just hope the snake count is low this year.  From what I’ve see so far, the ticks seem to be at an all time high.  I’ll try to keep you posted, but will be out of the office four days a week this year.  That will leave little time for blogging.  So until my next post, I’ll see you on the outcrop! Richard Hutto

Statemap Field Blog, March 31-April 2, 2014

 

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Hello all!

Another great week in the field.  Signs of spring are everywhere, and unfortunately the field season is drawing to a close.  We skipped around all over the Fairfield Bay quad this week, still trying to trace the very thick-, massive-bedded sandstone that we’re calling the base of the Bloyd for now.  Just off the eastern edge of the Fairfield Bay quad is a locally famous outcrop of that sandstone that was supposedly visited by Hernando Desoto himself in 1542.  Whether or not that’s true, it is a very impressive bluff shelter known as the Indian Rock House.  A lot of eroded material was removed from the floor of the shelter when the adjacent Indian Hills Golf Club was built, leaving behind the fine sandstone amphitheater we see today.   One could see how this formation could later become a natural bridge if erosion continues along the joint set parallel to the bluff face.  If that interior arch were to fall out, then the remaining one would form a bridge.  This is how most of the sandstone natural bridges in Arkansas are formed.  Lots of graffiti has been scratched into the friable rock over the years, including some that may have been carved by native people.

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On Tuesday, we finished up our field work on the lake.  We still had a couple islands we needed to visit, and the entire south side of the lake is so steep that access by land would be difficult.  We were excited to find more old river terraces on the islands, including one that would have been deposited on a cut-off meander in the area of Harpers Cove.  The deposit is about 80 feet above and over a half mile north of the current river channel (before the lake was there, that is).  The high end of the range for the downcutting rate for the Colorado River in the western Grand Canyon is 16 centimeters/1000 years, and I think we can all agree that downcutting there probably exceeds that in Arkansas.  Using that rate, an estimated 152,000 years would have passed since that terrace was deposited.  That gravel has been there a long time!  Of course, cutting off the meander would have stranded that deposit at that time, but don’t forget that this stream is developed in bedrock, so meander cut-off would be a fairly infrequent event.  To get a better estimate of these events, methods such as luminescence dating are being developed to age date the sand in these stranded river terraces.  With this new technology, perhaps someday we will know when these terraces were deposited.

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On the south side of lake below Stevens Point is a good example of a modern landslide, and a bit of a cautionary tale.  Sometimes clearing trees for roads and houses can have catastrophic results.  The photo tells the story.  The major part of this landslide occurred March 28, 2005 just after a road was cleared from the house down to the lake.  Most of the material at the edge of the lake on the north side of Hunter Mountain is there as a result of old landslides, therefore any development in this area can cause it to become unstable, as evidenced here.  That’s why part of our project includes mapping areas where landslides have occurred.

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Speaking of Hunter Mountain, we ran across one of the now ubiquitous gas well pads up there, and I thought you might be interested to know the function of each piece of typical well head production equipment.  At each wellhead is a set of valves that regulate the flow of gas.  These are often controlled remotely, thus the solar panels which power the system.  The big tanks near them contain hydrogen sulfide which is introduced into the gas right away to give it a strong odor.  This odor is, of course, quite useful to determine if there are any gas leaks since natural gas is odorless.  From the wellhead, the gas flows to the separators which remove any fluids contained in the gas.  This fluid could include heavy hydrocarbons, but is mostly produced water.  These fluids are stored in large tanks which are built inside a berm.  The berm is designed to hold 1 1/2 times the capacity of one of the storage tanks in case of a spill.  The level in the tanks is also monitored remotely and emptied on a regular basis.  From here, the gas is piped to a compression station where it undergoes further treatment.   Then it is sent through a transmission line and on to your house.  It’s not pretty, but for now, we have to have it.

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Well, next week will be the last of our field season.

Until then, see you on the outcrop!

 

Geopic of the Week

 

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Pedestals are a fairly common erosional feature in Arkansas in places where conditions are favorable.  They typically form in massive sandstone units due to an increased rate of erosion along the joint set near a bluff line.  Joints are vertical fractures within almost all rocks that formed in response to the tectonic stresses they have undergone in the distant past.  Joints are most often expressed as sets oriented in rhombohedral patterns.  Water can more easily penetrate the rocks along these joints, eventually opening a gap.  When this happens along joints parallel to a bluff face, the gap essentially cuts off the incipient pedestal from the influence of groundwater, isolating it from most of the processes of chemical weathering.  Once that happens the majority of weathering of the newly formed block of sandstone is done by wind and rain.  Because the corners and edges of a rhombohedron have more surface area, weathering is concentrated there, eventually rounding it off to form the typical pedestal shape.  In many places, a capstone of more resistant sandstone is present which contributes to the top-heavy pedestal or mushroom shape.  Also, the pedestal-forming unit is commonly underlain by shale or silty-shale on which the fully intact pedestal can slowly creep downslope.  Some of them end up quite a distance from the bluff where they started.  If you would like to view several fine examples of this erosional phenomenon, consider a visit to Pedestal Rocks Natural Area in the Ozark National Forest.       

Statemap Field Blog March 24-26, 2014

Taphoni (honeycomb weathering) in massive sandstone.

Taphoni (honeycomb weathering) in massive sandstone.

Hello all!

Sorry about that long hiatus, but I had a couple of extra projects the last couple months that took a lot of extra time.  We’ve been in the field almost every week except for March 3-5 during the 3 inch snow in Van Buren County.  We’ve mostly worked on the Fairfield Bay quad during the last few weeks.  This week was spent tracing a very thick-bedded, massive sandstone unit through the town of Fairfield Bay itself.  It is quite an impressive bluff-former and actually underlies almost the entire Mountain Ranch golf course.

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Danny descending treacherous massive sandstone outcrop

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Danny contemplating how this massive sandstone can all but disappear a few hundred yards north of here

 

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Grotto in massive sandstone

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Most hillsides are composed of a thick sequence of very thin sandstone/siltstone and shale–easily erodible

 

Apparently some structure or perhaps a change in depositional environment made this sandstone climb up 200 feet to the east.  There it forms the cap of the ridge on which the small town of Fairfield Bay sits.  Moving east again, It underlies the Indian Hills Country Club where weathering (and earth-moving equipment) has produced the famous Indian Rock House on the golf course there.  Underlying that massive across the entire area is a very thick sequence of very thin-bedded sandstone/siltstone/shale.  A lot of the roads built in this unit have formed deep gullies making some of them impassable.  Still, there is better access in this area than most that we map, so we’re thankful for that.  Only about two weeks left of the field season.  We’ll probably be jumping around a lot to work out problem areas on both quads during that time.

See you on the outcrop!

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Danny actually seeing through the groundcover to the rock beneath the Mountain Ranch golf course

 

 

 

 

 

Statemap Field Blog, Dec 16-18, 2013

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Hello all!

Well, it’s been a week and a half since the snow came down, and there are plenty of shady areas where it’s still on the ground.  We started out on the east side of the map in Deadland Hollow, even though it was north-facing, because we knew we could get to it fairly easily.  If anything, the snowy areas may even have been a little more treacherous this week, because it’s thawed and frozen so many times that it’s more like solid ice now.  After that we went all the way over to the west side of the map and got a few points in a small drainage south of Weaver Creek.

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On Tuesday we walked from the lake to the top of Dave Creek in an undeveloped part of Fairfield Bay.  Saw some really good worm burrows in a thin- to medium-bedded sandstone  near where the creek reaches the lake.  Some of these burrows crossed bedding planes, so the rate of sedimentation must have been fairly rapid during deposition of this unit.  2013-12-17 0102013-12-17 030

Above that, we were in fairly continuous outcrops of calcareous sandstone, including some beds of “zebra rock” (see previous two posts).  We can only surmise that we are again in the Witts Springs Formation, which is interesting in that it’s still at the surface south of that Weaver Creek/Middle Fork lineation.  This probably means that if the lineation formed due to a fault at the surface, there is minimal offset.  More likely, it indicates the lineation formed along a monocline at the surface perhaps indicating a fault at depth in the basement rock.  Anyway, we had several hundred feet of calcareous sandstone along the creek, some of which exhibited large scale cross-bedding.

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We’re still working on that Bloyd/Witts Springs contact, but probably did cross it somewhere in that upper end.  There may even be some Atoka up there, but if so, it will be in sparse exposures at the very highest elevations.  If the Bloyd proves to be several hundred feet thick here as it has been on other quads to the west, the only Atoka may be on the southern third of the Fairfield Bay quad south of the southwest/northeast lineation that goes through the upper end of Greers Ferry Lake.  This is almost undoubtedly a fault at the surface based on the steep dips we’ve been seeing on the north edge of the lake.

On Wednesday, we started at the lake again and went up a small drainage on the eastern edge of the map.  Had a great view of Sugar Loaf Mountain when we started that morning.

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Well, I hate to say it, but this will be the final blog of this field season.  I have a major test and a GSA field trip to prepare for this spring, so I need to devote all my time to that right now.  It’s been fun to write it, and I hope I’ve given you a better idea of what range of effort goes into making a “simple” geologic map.  We’ll keep going out until mid-April, then we’ll have about 10 weeks in the office to draw and digitize the two maps, add descriptions of the rock units, a cross section, stratigraphic column, joint diagram, and correlation of map units.  If all goes according to plan, we’ll turn the finished maps into the USGS on June 30 to fulfill our grant requirements.  The Shirley and the Fairfield Bay quads should be up on our website as a .pdf by mid-July.  By that time, we’ll be back in the field battling ticks and snakes next season–probably on the Parma and Greers Ferry quads.  Who knows, maybe I’ll start blogging again!  Until then, see you on the outcrop!

Statemap Field Blog Nov. 25-27, 2013

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Hello all!

A cold rain on Monday was freezing on the trees, so we explored some of the many undeveloped road networks in Fairfield Bay, especially along Dave Creek and down to the lake on the east side of the map.

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Not quite sure what we’re in here, but there is a calcareous sandstone massive not too far above lake level which could indicate that we’re still in the Witts Springs even though this is south of the lineation along the Middle Fork.  We’re getting a lot of strong southerly dips along the north edge of the lake which indicate there is a fault along that lineation, unfortunately the lake covers it.  Too bad this detailed geologic mapping was not done prior to 1963!

Tuesday we finished up the upper end of Big Branch.  The ice was still on the branches when we started, but soon began to melt which made it seem like it was raining again until about noon.

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At first, we thought we were finding additional Witts Springs/Cane Hill contacts, which was surprising since we were so far above where we had them downstream last week.  But we definitely had a thin-bedded sandstone that was shaly near the top beneath a classic basal Witts Springs sandstone.

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Or did we?  As it turned out, the thin-bedded sandstone was only about 40-60 feet thick and was above at least two other massive sandstone units.  Another Cane Hill look-alike!  That’s why you always have to look at the entire section, or you may miss something!

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What we took for the basal sandstone massive may actually have been the uppermost sandstone massive in the Witts Springs.  As we hiked on downstream, we did eventually find the actual Witts Springs/Cane Hill contact that lined up much better with the points we already had.

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Wednesday, it was so cold the moisture being wicked up certain grasses was making “frost flowers”.

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We walked up the lower end of Little Creek along the western edge of the map.  We had already seen the upper portion when we mapped Old Lexington, and it seems to be all Witts Springs in there.  We saw some good examples of “zebra rock” and “Prairie Grove weathering” in some of the massive sandstone units (see previous blog).

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Some of the calcareous sandstone is also fossiliferous, and I was lucky enough to find a good rugose coral weathering out in one fossiliferous zone.

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Well, looks like winter is here to stay!  At least I don’t have to watch for snakes anymore!  Until next week, see you on the outcrop!

STATEMAP Field Blog August 26-28, 2013

Hello all!

This week was a hot one, so we did some creek work, but also did some road work.  Went up a section of lower Lost Creek on Monday.  Narrowed down the Cane Hill/Imo to a fairly small area.Danny on Cane Hill in Lost CreekSand on shale in the Imo on Lost Creek

Saw more nice trace fossils in the Imo.

Trace fossils in ImoTrace fossils in the Imo

Got a few points on the Middle Fork where it leaves the Shirley quad and enters Greers Ferry Lake.

Thin-bedded sandstone in Middle Fork Little Red RiverThin-bedded sandstone in Middle Fork Little Red River

Quarry near Fairfield BayAlso, took points on a 4 different shale pits or quarries.

Green persimmons
The persimmons aren’t quite ripe yet!

Deformation bands in massive sandstoneFound these deformation bands right by Highway 16 near Fairfield Bay.  These bands are associated with structural features like faults and folds.  They form in more coarsely grained sandstone when the stress crushes the individual sand grains along a plane, then recrystallizes to form a slightly more resistant lithology, that when weatherd, stand in slight relief.   We will keep looking in this area for more clues and hopefully figure out what the rocks are trying to tell us!

Snake count: 2

Tick attacks: severe