Tag Archives: cretaceous

Geo-pic of the week: Chalk

 

Annona Fm (2)

Like the White Cliffs of Dover, England, the “White Cliffs of Arkansas” (pictured above) are composed of chalk.  Chalk is a marine sedimentary rock that forms of calcite-rich mud that accumulates in semi-deep marine environments.  The mud is composed of the accumulated skeletal remains of algal microorganisms called coccolithophores.  These algae grow and shed skeletal parts called coccoliths which they arrange around them, in life, in a structure called a coccosphere.  Below is a scanning electron microscopic image of some coccospheres (borrowed from news.algaeworld.org).

coccolithophores

Chalk in Arkansas is found in the Annona Formation, which formed in the late Cretaceous Period, and crops out in southwest Arkansas as well as parts of Texas.  In addition to being mined to make blackboard chalk, this resource is also used in brick, and cement manufacture. 

Geo-pic of the week: Igneous Dike

igneous dike

 

100 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous Period, a preponderance of igneous activity occurred in the continental region now known as Arkansas.  In fact, all of the igneous rocks discovered in the state were emplaced around that time.  Some of them are well known, such as Magnet Cove, located east of Hot Springs, or the diamond-bearing intrusion near Murfreesboro.    There are also lots of smaller igneous intrusions like the one shown in the picture above. 

Small igneous intrusions are found throughout the Ouachita Mountains.  There are so many small intrusions that new ones are regularly discovered.  Weathering at the earth’s surface has typically destroyed the original rock’s characteristics and what remains is mostly soft clay because the minerals that make up the intrusion are unstable under surface conditions. 

If you happen to notice an unusual-looking body of rock that cuts across the strata of a road cut or other rock outcrop when you’re exploring the Ouachita Mountains, it’s likely that you have seen a Cretaceous igneous dike.